How to: make seats with torn fabric

I’d like to show you another technique that will work great on heavily weathered projects. Tanks are generally made of metal so we want this material to look good on our models. But non-metallic elements can also be taken to the next level. So take a look at this tutorial and maybe it will inspire you to make some cool effects.

Just FYI, I didn’t invent this technique. I saw other modellers use it before but I don’t know who should I give the credit to. If you do, please let me know.

Step 1:

Prepare your tools. All you are going to need are: aluminium foil (the type you use in your kitchen or thicker one), sharp hobby knife and some CA glue. 

Step 2:

First paint the filling of the seats.

I used a dark orange base and some lighter colours applied with a sponge to simulate upholstery foam. 

Step 3:

Take care of some basic weathering.

A dark wash will be enough unless you want to expose huge parts of the filling. In this case some additional effects may be a good idea.

Step 4:

Wrap the seats in aluminium foil, cut the excess with a fresh hobby blade and then fix the edges with some CA glue. 

I know, this is easier said than done. One mistake and the foil is damaged. And this will instantly ruin your work. But trust me, you can do it.

Step 5:

Paint the covering the way you want and then start making holes in the foil.

Again, be extra careful while doing this as the foil is fragile and can easily be torn apart. The best technique is to make a small cut with a knife and then reveal the hole using tweezers. You can also use a needle to create smaller holes. 

Step 6:

Paint the edges of the holes to hide the cuts.

I usually use a colour that is a little lighter than the base.

Step 7:

Weather the seat using techniques suitable for you project.

For damp environments I like to use dark green colour to recreate moss or mould.

Step 8:

After some final touches the seat is ready. Attach it to your model. 

Step 9 (optional):

Accept the fact that after a shitload of work, the effect will barely be visible on your finished piece.

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